Welcome to the Cromwell Association

Cromwell Association Study Day

Oxford, Saturday 16th October 2021

A major research project to re-examine all of the known writings and speeches of Oliver Cromwell is now in its final stages, with publication due in 2022. Led by Professor John Morrill, of the University of Cambridge, a team of academics has examined every document in close detail, including some that have never been previously published. It has been an enormous task and will provide a new basis for Cromwell scholarship for years to come, and the new edition will become the standard reference work for future generations.

This year’s Study Day, to be held in central Oxford on Saturday 16th October, will focus on the forthcoming publication, and the lessons and challenges it has created. The concluding session will be a debate, when Professor Morrill will discuss with Professor Ronald Hutton, author of a new biography of Cromwell, the intriguing question,

Can we take Cromwell at his word?

For more information and details of how to book your place follow this link. The event is open to both members and non-members. In the event of the event being cancelled, due to the pandemic, all bookings will be refunded.

Historians debating key issues

For several years the Cromwell Association has run an annual Schools’ Conference. In 2020, due to the Pandemic it had to be cancelled, and circumstances meant that it could not take place in person in 2021, but in May, Jon Fitzgibbons (University of Lincoln), Peter Gaunt (University of Chester), Clive Holmes (University of Oxford) and David Smith (University of Cambridge) got together to record this year’s event via Zoom. The debates are aimed at a Sixth Form audience and centre around typical A Level and equivalent type questions. However, they can be enjoyed by anyone interested in this period and therefore we would like to offer all our members the chance to watch and enjoy the debates this year. The Association would like to thank Stuart Orme of the Cromwell Museum for co-ordinating and recording these debates.

Schools’ History Conference 2021 video lectures

Introduction
Early life
1616-17
1628-29
1640
1642
1643
1644
1645
1647
1648
1649
1650
1651
1653
1654
1655
1656
1657
1658
Introduction

Introduction

Since Oliver Cromwell's death as Lord Protector in 1658 his life, ambitions, motives and actions have been the subject of scholarly investigation and intense, often vitriolic, debate. Whatever position is taken on Cromwell, "Chief of Men"; or "Brave Bad Man", his importance as a key figure in one of the most troubled periods of British history is unassailable.
Early life

Early life

Oliver Cromwell was born in Huntingdon, England on April 25th 1599. He attended Huntingdon Grammar School, now the Cromwell Museum.
1616-17

1616-17

Cromwell enters Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge - a college with strong Puritan ethos - to study Law. After the death of his father in June 1617 he leaves college, without taking his degree, to support his family.
1628-29

1628-29

Cromwell becomes the Member of Parliament for Huntingdon in 1628. In 1629 Parliament is dissolved by Charles I.
1640

1640

Charles I reconvenes Parliament. Cromwell is returned as Member of Parliament for Cambridge.
1642

1642

Cromwell raises troops for Parliament.
1643

1643

Cromwell becomes Colonel in the Eastern Association.
1644

1644

Cromwell is made Lieutenant-General of the Eastern Association Army - Battle of Marston Moor, 2 July - Battle of Newbury, 27 October
1645

1645

Cromwell promoted to Lieutenant-General of New Model Army - Battle of Naseby, 14 June
1647

1647

Supports Parliamentary Army in clashes with Parliament.
1648

1648

Crushes royalist rising in South Wales - Battle of Preston, 18 August
1649

1649

Supports trial and execution of King Charles I, January - Commands army sent to crush Ireland, August
1650

1650

Commands army sent to crush Scotland, July - Battle of Dunbar, 3 September
1651

1651

Battle of Worcester, 3 September
1653

1653

Cromwell dissolves Parliament, 20 April - Cromwell becomes Lord Protector
1654

1654

Meets first Protectorate Parliament, September
1655

1655

System of Major-Generals established, October
1656

1656

Meets second Protectorate Parliament
1657

1657

Rejects Parliament's offer of the crown and remains Lord Protector, March to June
1658

1658

Cromwell dies at Whitehall, 3 September

Welcome to the home page of the Cromwell Association. We aim to encourage interest in the life and times of Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector, who was born in Huntingdon in 1599 and died at Whitehall in 1658. Cromwell is an intensely controversial figure equally reviled and revered both during his lifetime and after. This site contains a wide range of information and resources to investigate. Explore the site to find out more about his life, times and significance.

If you are interested to see if a particular place has a connection to Cromwell, look at The Cromwellian Gazetteer, a comprehensive guide to places connected to Cromwell. It also has a very useful guide to where Cromwell was on any particular date.

Perhaps you are interested in your family history and want to look at a genealogy of Cromwell. This site has a full family tree for Cromwell and his descendants, down to about 1900. If you are looking for an ancestor who you believe may have been an officer in the parliamentary army, browse the Directory of Parliamentary Officers.

Our annual journal, Cromwelliana, is a rich resource of articles on Cromwell and other aspects of 17th century history. The whole archive of the journal, other than the most recent, is available free for you to look at.

The Association was established in 1937 and has a wide range of members all fascinated, for many different reasons, by the complexity of both Cromwell as an individual and the age in which he lived. We welcome new members and invite you to consider joining us. Click for more membership benefits.

A brief history of Oliver Cromwell